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Never Stop Creating

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emojigrl:

flying-blades:

Spongebob - I Don’t Like

this is historically significant

(via ruinedchildhood)

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Invitation to an Area night club party. The capsule was placed in water and the invitation appeared. Area was open from 1983 to 1987.

(via liteskint)

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nprfreshair:

George Takei became famous for his role in Star Trek as Mr. Sulu, but in the last decade, he’s drawn followers who admire him because of who he is—not just who he has played. The new documentary about his life is called To Be Takei.
He joins Fresh Air to talk about growing up in a Japanese internment camp, avoiding stereotypical roles, and coming out as gay at 68. 
Here he explains why he was closeted for most of his life: 

The thing that affected me in the early part of my career was … there was a very popular box office movie star — blonde, good-looking, good actor — named Tab Hunter. He was in almost every other movie that came out. He was stunningly good-looking and all-American in looks. And then one of the scandals sheets of that time — sort of like The Inquirertoday — exposed him as gay. And suddenly and abruptly, his career came to a stop.That was, to me, chilling and stunning. I was a young no-name actor, aspiring to build this career — and I knew that [if] it were known that I was gay, then there would be no point to my pursuing that career. I desperately and passionately wanted a career as an actor, so I chose to be in the closet. I lived a double life. And that means you always have your guard up. And it’s a very, very difficult and challenging way to live a life.

Photo by Kevin Scanlon via LA Weekly 

nprfreshair:

George Takei became famous for his role in Star Trek as Mr. Sulu, but in the last decade, he’s drawn followers who admire him because of who he is—not just who he has played. The new documentary about his life is called To Be Takei.

He joins Fresh Air to talk about growing up in a Japanese internment camp, avoiding stereotypical roles, and coming out as gay at 68. 

Here he explains why he was closeted for most of his life: 

The thing that affected me in the early part of my career was … there was a very popular box office movie star — blonde, good-looking, good actor — named Tab Hunter. He was in almost every other movie that came out. He was stunningly good-looking and all-American in looks. And then one of the scandals sheets of that time — sort of like The Inquirertoday — exposed him as gay. And suddenly and abruptly, his career came to a stop.

That was, to me, chilling and stunning. I was a young no-name actor, aspiring to build this career — and I knew that [if] it were known that I was gay, then there would be no point to my pursuing that career. I desperately and passionately wanted a career as an actor, so I chose to be in the closet. I lived a double life. And that means you always have your guard up. And it’s a very, very difficult and challenging way to live a life.

Photo by Kevin Scanlon via LA Weekly 

578 notes

Anonymous asked: What are your reasons for university's to pay college athletes? The kids are at the university to learn and make a career especially if some kids get a scholarship. This topic is some bullshit and shouldn't even exist.

vikinglordlesnar:

angryblackman:

yourmominbedonfriday:

mucinexfiend:

titytwochainz:

First off, you’re an idiot. Secondly, the plural of university does not have an apostrophe, it’s universities. Now that we have your shortcomings out of the way, let’s address the real problem. 

College athletes are held to near impossible standards. All they have time for is practice, playing and school. The mandatory hours you have to put in, in order to meet requirements leaves you no time to fit in a job. So now on top of the mental stress keeping your GPA up, the physical stress of practicing and playing, you also are flat broke. Yes, you put in more work than most of the country and you do it for free.

Not only can you not have a job, but they have insane rules about you making any money at all. It is completely illegal to receive any type of benefits from people. That means even if a rich guy appreciates your play on the field, and sees you struggling, he can’t give you a car to make life easier, or money for clothes to at least look good. You can’t even sell your own shit! Johnny Manziel and Terrell Pryor were both under investigation for selling their own autographs. Pryor didn’t even make money off of his. He traded them for tattoos and he was suspended and forced to leave school to attend a supplemental draft where he wouldn’t be eligible to make half the money he would in the real draft. 

Division 1 college sports are a billion dollar empire. They are so lucrative that the prize for predicting a perfect bracket is 1 billion dollars. Could you imagine being the backbone of a billion dollar business, but struggling to eat. But I guess it’s fair if you get the empty promise of a degree that might not be worth the paper it’s printed on by the time they hand it to you.

Yes pay the future millionaires more!!!

Then how about you drop the athletics and actually just focus on school? And getting a job? A job you can have past age 30-40? oh yeah I guess with athletics you won’t need a job past 30 BECAUSE YOU’LL BE ABLE TO MAKE MILLIONS OF DOLLARS UNLIKE EVERYONE ELSE THAT GOES TO COLLEGE FOR ANYTHING ELSE. 

Yes, because every athlete that is an athlete in college makes over a million when they’re done. Yes, because every athlete that is an athlete in college ends up running in the Olympics or playing in the NBA, Yesm because every athlete ends up with some kind of major sponsorship deal.

Do you realise how incredibly stupid and salty you sound? Do you? You sound like one of those “I hate sports LOL” types. Not everyone will be able to make a million dollars out of playing sports. What’s so hard to understand about that? Is there an actual myth going around with some of you people, saying that everyone will make a guaranteed million from playing sports?

They can’t exactly drop their sport, because for some, that’s what they are there for and that’s what they worked hard for. Just like you in that course you always wanted at university. Telling them to simply drop it is idiotic. Also, for some, they need to stay in college for t least a year before they can be selected for the NBA Draft and whatever. And fun fact, athletes do end up with degrees too.

The whole argument is this: the college/university makes money off of the students; work them to death; sell their likeness for merchandise and games; broadcasts them play; and they give them nothing for it. The least they could do is pay them or give them some sort of benefits.

Once again: no one is going to make a guaranteed million from this. Stop sounding so salty. And if you don’t think they should be paid, because it’s sports and ‘they’ll get paid anyway’, you need to take several seats. Stop being salty about successful athletes making more than you ever will, and look at the issue at hand, which is, the NCAA is benefiting off of students and they’re not receiving any benefit from it.

Not to mention they can’t fucking drop the sport they’re in because most, if not all, the student athletes [specifically football and men’s college basketball] are there on athletic scholarships rather than academic ones. Once you take out the reason for why they’re there, the school can dismiss them from attending and enrolling.

College sports is a joke. Why should athletes have to attend college to get a professional career? Why should academics have to share the same campus with students who are there to play sports instead of actually learn anything? But, with all the money they bring into the universities they deserve something for putting in long hours at practice, sacrificing their bodies and giving up on any hope of intellectual pursuits all in the name of being a better athlete. If the universities are going to expect their athletes to play and produce like professionals then they need to pay them as such. But, ultimately I think they should just cut all sports programs in college and just focus on education.